Black Galingale is Thailand's Male Enhancement Herb, a Natural "Viagra"
Kaempferia parviflora (Thai pronunciation as in Krachai Dam or Krachai Dum)
  • Increases libido and lust
  • Improves endurance and vitality
  • Increases strength and energy
  • Reduces fatigue

This relatively small plant is a member of the ginger family and is found mainly in the northeastern part of Thailand (about 500-700 meters above sea level). By the Thai people (especially men), this plant is very polular because of his versatility and especially known as a potential natural means with an extremely good efficiency and no side effects. Especially under the Muay Thai fighters, the Krachai Dam is popular because it gives them extra strength and energy. This short-lived plant blooms in spring and one month after flowering its healing ingredients in the root develop. This was the reason that Kaempferia parviflora was almost unknown outside Asia. Because a better functioning of the libido often goes hand in hand with an increased testosterone level and thus an overall rejuvenating effect, this plant quickly drew the keen interest of Western science.  Source: H & H Health & Herbals.

There is an easier, healthier, safer way to have stronger, more frequent, and longer-lasting erections. Black Galingale is an herbal infusion from the North of Thailand. It has been used for centuries by men of the region to enhance their sexual potency.  Source: Aphrodesiac Tea.com

This herb is grown in Thailand and successfully used by Thailand doctors in the aid and prevention of strokes, heart arrhythmia, heart palpitations, irregular heartbeat, blood circulation, fatigue, and high blood pressure. Thailand doctors report that best results are normally obtained by daily supplementation of small amounts (500mg to 1,000mg) of this natural herb ground into powder form. Alcohol extracted Black Galingale is also used for the treatment of erection dysfunction. Although a very effective and useful herb, Black Galingale is surprisingly unknown to most doctors and herbalists in Western countries.   Source: AskARealDoctor.com

The rhizomes of Black Galingale (Kaempferia parviflora =KP) have been used for centuries in the traditional medicine of Southeast Asia for health promotion and for the treatment of digestive disorders and gastric ulcer. More importantly, daily consumption of KP rhizome in various beverage forms is widely believed to improve erectile function, and in Thailand it is commonly referred to as the "Thai Viagra". Laboratory testing has shown very positive results; when administered at sufficient dosage over a period of several weeks, KP produces higher levels of nitric oxide in the penis, which is the chemical trigger for an erection.

At present there is no direct competition for this market. Various dietary supplements and herbal treatments promise an immediate action and short term benefit. None of them, however, emphasize daily consumption and cumulative, ongoing results. With KP the long term benefits include more frequent, longer lasting and more firm erections -- with an accompanying feeling of sexual rejuvenation that is mild but stable and consistent -- without any negative side effects. This change occurs gradually, with a sense of normalcy, and begins to be felt within 7-10 days (approximately), given twice daily consumption. Natural spontaneity can return to the consumer's life, as there is no need to schedule sexual relations around taking a pill. The need for pharmaceutical support diminishes and becomes unnecessary over time.
The rhizomes of Black Galingale (Kaempferia parviflora =KP) have been used for centuries in the traditional medicine of Southeast Asia for health promotion and for the treatment of digestive disorders and gastric ulcer. More importantly, daily consumption of KP rhizome in various beverage forms is widely believed to improve erectile function, and in Thailand it is commonly referred to as the "Thai Viagra". Laboratory testing has shown very positive results; when administered at sufficient dosage over a period of several weeks, KP produces higher levels of nitric oxide in the penis, which is the chemical trigger for an erection.
At present there is no direct competition for this market. Various dietary supplements and herbal treatments promise an immediate action and short term benefit. None of them, however, emphasize daily consumption and cumulative, ongoing results. With KP the long term benefits include more frequent, longer lasting and more firm erections -- with an accompanying feeling of sexual rejuvenation that is mild but stable and consistent -- without any negative side effects. This change occurs gradually, with a sense of normalcy, and begins to be felt within 7-10 days (approximately), given twice daily consumption. Natural spontaneity can return to the consumer's life, as there is no need to schedule sexual relations around taking a pill. The need for pharmaceutical support diminishes and becomes unnecessary over time.   Source: Krashy's Blog

The amazing healing properties of Thai herbs are truly staggering. The bitter root, black galingale, is taken as an aphrodisiac by men and was improving vitality long before Viagra came onto the market. Meanwhile, female villagers in rural Thailand have been ingesting the magically rejuvenating kudzu root for centuries as a youth restoring potion that smoothes out wrinkles, improves eyesight, promotes hair growth and generally puts a spring back in the step. And while 'king of bitters' tastes exactly as its name suggests, it is known to be a potent and speedy remedy if suffering with the sniffles of a common cold. The dazzling array of Thai botanicals is an inescapable element to daily life in the kingdom. — Source: Tourism Authority of Thailand TATnews 5 Feb 2013

In ancient times, a hill tribe called "Hmong" brought Black Galingale from China, and grew it in Ampher Dan-sai and Ampher Na-Haew in the Loei province of Thailand. They used Black Galingale as a medicinal herb in their homes. Black Galingale is a traditional herbal tea used for centuries in Thailand to promote erectile function, to increase libido, and maintain penile erection.

There are many products that use Black Galingale as an ingredient. We want to get the most benefit from Black Galingale. We found a source in the north-east of Thailand where a superior and potent Black Galingale is grown. This is the Black Galingale we use in our herb tea. We are proud to present our product in which you can taste the strength and intensity.   Source: Herbal Shrine

Kaempferia Parviflora, Krachai Dam, Black Galingale Kaempferia Parviflora is a natural male vigor enhancer. Gives the male body new power and vigor. It stimulates vitality and stamina and reduces fatigue.   Sources: Thanyaporn Herbs Thailand and RAKSA Thai Herbal Product

KrachaiDam herb juice — Other health effects: Keampferia Pandurata Herb: Amazing Herbs For Amazing health. Keampferia Pandurata or (KrachaiDam or Black Galingale.)is traditional herbal medicine that helps slow down aging. It has a spicy taste (but it is not as spicy as chili). According to several Thai traditional texts, Krachai Dam helps the following affects:

  • Reduces sugar in the blood
  • Reduces blood pressure
  • Creates blood balance
  • Reduces pain in the body, in the back
  • Reduce pain in the chest, headache, fainting, and fever
  • Stimulates heart beat, helps blood circulation, makes one look fresh
  • Enlarges blood tubes, helps reduce cholesterol
  • Helps digestive system, alleviates stomach age, and ulcer
  • Increases sexual efficiency in men
  • Good for gastric system
  • Alleviates hemorhoids, diabetes.
  • Furthermore, KrachaiDam helps stimulate the body-sensation. It helps to overcome tiredness while driving a long time. For the lady, KrachaiDam helps balance the hormones, regulate the menstrual periods, enrich the blood, and freshens the skin. This is a Thai herb without side effects. [Text edited.]   Source: weiku integrating Global Trade Leads.

    Chronic Toxicity Study of Kaempferia parviflora Wall ex. Extract   Abstract: K. parviflora is a medicinal plant possessing high potential for development of various health products. The objective of this chronic toxicity study was to investigate the safety of ethanolic extract of chronic Kaempferia parviflora Wall ex Bak in Wistar rats. The animals were randomly divided into five groups, twenty four rats each (12 males and 12 females). Three treatment groups were orally administered with K. parviflora extract at doses of 5, 50 and 500 mg/kg/day for six months respectively, which were equivalent to 1, 10 and 100 times of human use, while two control groups were orally given with distilled water and 1.0% tragacanth, respectively. The results showed that male rats receiving K. parviflora extract at dose of 500 mg/kg had significantly lower body weight than both control groups (p<0.05). The alterations of a few hematological parameters in the highest dose-treated groups were within the normal range. Male rats receiving the highest dose of K. parviflora extract had significantly lower triglyceride level than their two control groups (p<0.05) whereas female rats receiving the same dose had significantly higher glucose and cholesterol levels than their control groups (p<0.05). Histopathological study of visceral organs revealed no remarkable lesions related to the toxicity of K. parviflora extract.

    IntroductionKaempferia parviflora Wall Ex. Baker or Krachaidam is a plant belonging to the family Zingiberaceae (Sirirugsa, 1992). The rhizomes of this plant have been traditionally used for leucorrhea, oral diseases, abdominal pain, health promotion and aphrodisiac (Wutythamawech, 1997). Phytochemical studies revealed that the rhizomes of K. parviflora contained volatile oil (Wongsinkongman et al., 2003), chalcones (Herunsalee, 1987), phenolic glycosides (Azuma et al., 2008) and many flavonoids such as 5-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavonone, 5, 7-dimethoxyflavone and 3, 5, 7-trimethoxyflavone (Jaipetch et al., 1983). The K. parviflora has been demonstrated to possess antifungal, antiplasmodial, antimycobacterial (Yenjai et al., 2004), anti HIV-1 protease (Sookkongwaree et al., 2006), anti-allergic (Tewtrakool et al., 2008) and anti-gastric ulcers (Rujjanawate et al., 2005). It has been reported that the ethanolic extract and 5-hydroxy-3,7,3',4',-tetramethoxyflavone of this plant exhibit appreciable inhibitory effects on nitric oxide and PGE2 release from murine macrophage cells (Tewtrakul and Subhadhirasakul, 2008). In addition, the ethanolic extract of Krachaidam has been shown to induce relaxation of both aortic rings and ileum precontracted with phenylephrine and acetylcholine (Wattanapitayakul et al., 2008). Although K. parviflora has been shown to possess high potentials for development of health products, chronic toxicity study of its extracts has never been reported. In this study, we investigated chronic toxicity of the K. parviflora ethanolic extract in Wistar rats to support the use of health products from K. parviflora.   Source: "Chronic Toxicity Study of Kaempferia parviflora Wall ex. Extract" Songpol Chivapat, Pranee Chavalittumrong, Aimmanas Attawish, Anudep Rungsipipat Thai J. Vet. Med. 2010. 40(4): 377-383.

    Questions: Herbal Extracts versus the Whole Herb. Which is Healthier?

    Q. In terms of herbal supplements, and in particular the ones containing herbal "extracts", I've been wondering whether herbal "extracts" are really such a good idea, in that these herbal extracts, as I understand it, contain isolated and concentrated components of herbs, these components being what are considered the "active" components. My concerns are:
    1) when these so-called "active" herbal components are isolated and concentrated in this way, are we not possibly excluding other important synergistic components that would normally work with these components in the natural situation, i.e. in the whole herb? , and
    2) when the components are concentrated in this way, is this not now bordering on being like an artificial drug where the active herbal components are present in amounts not normally found in the natural whole herb? Add to that the fact that other components are excluded which otherwise (at least I wonder) maybe would have somehow "balanced" these active components. Is this then safe? Basically I've been wondering these things, comparing whole herbs to herbal extracts. Hope your highly knowledgeable staff will enlighten me as usual. Thanks much.
    A. This is an excellent question. There is no blanket statement that can be made. Each herb has to be evaluated individually to see whether the whole herb or the extract is preferable. With some herbs, it may be better to take the whole herb, and with others, an herbal extract may be preferable. Sometimes the active ingredients are too minimal within the herb, or they may be toxic or unwanted substances within the herb that need to be removed in order to obtain the active ingredients without toxicity. As a rule, I prefer the whole herb, but I have no problems using extracts when appropriate. Sometimes, in order to elicit a benefit, the active ingredients have to be concentrated in order for therapeutic amount of the active herb to fit in a capsule. We have to keep in mind that nature did not produce herbs with the idea that these would be beneficial to human consumption or to treat a human medical condition. Herbs evolved in order to protect themselves from microbes, insects and animals that would eat them or to protect themselves from harsh environmental conditions. It just happens that certain herbs have some beneficial compounds that we find helpful. But this does not mean that every molecule or substances within an herb is beneficial. As to whether they are considered a drug when herbal extracts are concentrated, it depends on how one defines a drug. I consider a drug any substance that is not normally found in the body. By this definition most herbs are drugs, whether whole or concentrated, or extracted. However, there are substances within herbs that are useful to the body and are normally found in the body. For instance, goji berry has zeaxanthin, a carotenoid, which is found in the retina and other tissues. Hence, certain components of some herbs are not drugs but supply crucial molecules to the body. One advantage of standardized herbal extracts is that different research labs can compare their results using the exact same herbal extract. One example is ginkgo extract, another is saw palmetto. Bottom line: no sweeping statements can be made that apply to all herbs. Each herb and herbal extract needs to be evaluated individually in different dosages for each person who is using them, and also how they interact with other supplements and medicines. There are too many variables that prevent a simplistic answer. Furthermore, different raw material processing companies may have different ways to make herbal extracts, and one batch from one company may be slightly or significantly different than form another company. Add the fact that soil conditions, temperature, time of harvesting all influence an herb's composition, you can see why no simple answers can be given.
    Q. Will any of the medicinal herbs damage the kidneys or liver, what I mean if they are taken as directed on the bottle.
    A. It is possible. Herbs are potent and can have benefits and side effects, just like medicines.
    — Source: Ray Sahelian, M.D. Information on Medicinal herbs, Vitamins, Chinese Herbs, Spices, and Adaptogens.

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    Created 2012-02-03